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TheFatRat - Monody (feat. Laura Brehm) - YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7xai5u_tnk
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Nov 7, 2015 ... My new song "The Storm" is out now! https://youtu.be/L4bZRIwI-QA Stream TheFatRat - Monody feat. Laura Brehm on all platforms: ... We’ll stop supporting this browser soon. For the best experience please update your browser. Your browser does not currently recognize any of the video formats available. Click here to visit our frequently asked questions about HTML5 video. TheFatRat - Monody (feat. Laura Brehm) TheFatRat - The Calling (feat. Laura Brehm) Mix - TheFatRat - Monody (feat. Laura Brehm) Tones and I - Dance Monkey (Lyrics) TheFatRat - Monody (feat. Laura Brehm) (Orchestral Remix by sJLs) (Lyrics Video) Janji - Heroes Tonight (feat. Johnning) [NCS Release] Top 20 songs of TheFatRat 2017 - TheFatRat Mega Mix Cartoon - Why We Lose (feat. Coleman Trapp) [NCS Release] TheFatRat & JJD - Prelude (VIP Edit) Different Heaven & EH!DE - My Heart [NCS Release] TheFatRat - Fly Away feat. Anjulie Pacific Rim (feat. Tom Morello) TheFatRat & Alan Walker feat. Laura Brehm - Monody (New Song 2017) TheFatRat - MAYDAY feat. Laura Brehm Language: English Location: Russia Restricted Mode: Off History Help Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features



Monody | music | Britannica

https://www.britannica.com/art/monody
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Monody, style of accompanied solo song consisting of a vocal line, which is frequently embellished, and simple, often expressive, harmonies. It arose about ... WRITTEN BY: The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica Monody, style of accompanied solo song consisting of a vocal line, which is frequently embellished, and simple, often expressive, harmonies. It arose about 1600, particularly in Italy, as a response to the contrapuntal style (based on the combination of simultaneous melodic lines) of 16th-century vocal genres such as the madrigal and motet. Ostensibly in an attempt to emulate ancient Greek music, composers placed renewed emphasis on proper articulation as well as expressive interpretation of often highly emotional texts. These effects could be achieved only by abandoning counterpoint and replacing it by simply accompanied recitative. This new monodic style, pioneered by the Florentine Camerata and other humanistic circles in Italy, quickly grew into the dramatic stile rappresentativo of early opera as well as the concertato style that revolutionized sacred music shortly after 1600. In both instances the dense textures of 16th-century polyphony yielded to the polarization of treble parts and the ubiquitous basso continuo, or figured bass, played by an instrumentalist or instrumentalists who were free to play any notes that they liked as long as they followed the harmonic figures written above the bass part. Giulio Caccini’s Le nuove musiche (1602; The New Music), a collection of solo songs with continuo accompaniment, exemplifies early monody, as do many solo compositions of Claudio Monteverdi. The use of the word monody to designate an unaccompanied melodic line, properly called monophony, is confusing, despite its long tradition, especially in Great Britain.



Monody - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monody
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In music, monody refers to a solo vocal style distinguished by having a single melodic line and instrumental accompaniment. Although such music is found in ... From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (September 2018) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) For the band of the same name, see Monody (band). For the 2015 music single, see TheFatRat. Caccini, Le Nuove musiche, 1601, title page In poetry, the term monody has become specialized to refer to a poem in which one person laments another's death. (In the context of ancient Greek literature, monody, μονῳδία could simply refer to lyric poetry sung by a single performer, rather than by a chorus.) In music, monody refers to a solo vocal style distinguished by having a single melodic line and instrumental accompaniment. Although such music is found in various cultures throughout history, the term is specifically applied to Italian song of the early 17th century, particularly the period from about 1600 to 1640. The term is used both for the style and for individual songs (so one can speak both of monody as a whole as well as a particular monody). The term itself is a recent invention of scholars. No composer of the 17th century ever called a piece a monody. Compositions in monodic form might be called madrigals, motets, or even concertos (in the earlier sense of "concertato", meaning "with instruments"). In monody, which developed out of an attempt by the Florentine Camerata in the 1580s to restore ancient Greek ideas of melody and declamation (probably with little historical accuracy), one solo voice sings a melodic part, usually with considerable ornamentation, over a rhythmically independent bass line. Accompanying instruments could be lute, chitarrone, theorbo, harpsichord, organ, and even on occasion guitar. While some monodies were arrangements for smaller forces of the music for large ensembles which was common at the end of the 16th century, especially in the Venetian School, most monodies were composed independently. The development of monody was one of the defining characteristics of early Baroque practice, as opposed to late Renaissance style, in which groups of voices sang independently and with a greater balance between parts.



Monody | Music 101

https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-musicapp-medieval.../monody/
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In music, the term monody refers to a solo vocal style distinguished by having a single melodic line and instrumental accompaniment. More specifically it applies to ... One of the aims of the scholars in the Florentine Camerata was to make the music serve the text. They objected to the obscuring of the text and its meaning that was common in late Renaissance polyphony, and they sought to create a new musical style that would be more expressive and reflective of the text. To do this, they looked back to the traditions of ancient Greek drama—or at least to their limited understanding of those traditions. The result of their efforts was the singing style we refer to as monody. Though monody in its strictest form did not remain in use very long, it had enormous influence on the emerging vocal genres of opera, cantata, and oratorio. In music, the term monody refers to a solo vocal style distinguished by having a single melodic line and instrumental accompaniment. More specifically it applies to Italian song of the early seventeenth century, particularly the period from about 1600 to 1640. The term itself is a recent invention of scholars: no composer of the seventeenth century ever called a piece a monody. In the Baroque, compositions in monodic style were labeled madrigals, motets, or even concertos (in the earlier sense of “concertato,” meaning “with instruments”). Figure 1. Caccini, Le Nuove musiche, 1601, title page In monody, which developed out of an attempt by the Florentine Camerata in the 1580s to restore ancient Greek ideas of melody and declamation (probably with little historical accuracy), a solo voice sings a rhythmically free melodic line in a declamatory style. Early Baroque composer’s primary goal in monodic composition was to have the music conform to the natural rhythm and meaning of the text. This was a reaction to the complex polyphony of late Renaissance choral music in which the text was often obscured by the independence of the various lines. This vocal melody was sparsely accompanied by the bass line and improvised chords of basso continuo instrument pair. The development of monody was one of the defining characteristics of early Baroque practice, as opposed to late Renaissance style, in which groups of voices sang independently and with a greater balance between parts.



Monody | Grove Music

https://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/grovemusic/.../omo-9781561592630-e- 0000018977
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Monody locked. Nigel Fortune; , revised by Tim ... (1) Term applied to music consisting of a single line; see Monophony . Historians and ethnomusicologists have ... Nigel Fortune, revised by Tim Carter (1) Term applied to music consisting of a single line; see Monophony . Historians and ethnomusicologists have variously applied it to ancient musics, chant and monophonic (e.g. troubadour) song. Some modern composers have also used it in titles or as a generic label, usually with archaizing intent and to indicate a set of technical and structural constraints applied more or less loosely. (2) Accompanied Italian solo song, especially secular, of the period c 1600–40. The term can either denote an individual song or define the entire body of such songs (and solo recitatives in operas and other works can also be described as monodic). Its use in these senses is a product of modern scholarship; the word was certainly never used by the composers themselves, although there are precedents in 17th-century theory of a more humanist bent (e.g. G.B. Doni). The songs that it embraces are those for solo voice and continuo dating from the inception of the medium at the close of the 16th century to the emergence of the chamber cantata. The accompanying instruments most frequently used were the lute, chitarrone, theorbo, harpsichord and, for lighter songs, guitar. Obbligato instruments occasionally appear, but there is no evidence that a bass viol or similar instrument doubled the continuo bass.... You do not currently have access to this article Please login to access the full content. Please subscribe to access the full content.





Baroque Terms ***** Idiomatic Writing: Music that is written for a specific instrument, taking ... Monody: A musical texture with an ornate melody for one singer, supported by a ...

https://wmich.edu/musicgradexamprep/BaroqueTermsPDF.pdf

Idiomatic Writing: Music that is written for a specific instrument, taking ... Monody:
A musical texture with an ornate melody for one singer, supported by a ...





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