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Shaw Industries Martinet Dunes Carpet - San Antonio, Texas - CRT ...

https://www.crtflooring.com/shaw-industries-martinet-beiges-dunes-carpet- flooring-00102_e0607
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Martinet by Shaw Industries · Martinet Winter White 00100 · Martinet Dunes 00102 · Martinet Canvas 00103 · Martinet Chamois 00200 · Martinet Cold Water 00500. TO HELP AID IN THE RECOVERY OF OUR ECONOMY, FOR THE 1ST TIME EVER CRT FLOORING IS OFFERING 24 MONTHS AT 0% ! LEARN MORE → COMPLETE THE FORM BELOW TO RECEIVE OUR BEST PRICE Keep me up to date with exclusive offers. The Benefit of Waterproof Floors



PACE SETTER E0527 - COLD WATER | Carpets

https://shawfloors.com/flooring/carpet/details/pace-setter.../cold-water
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See Shaw's New Life Happens Water Proof Carpet. Explore Carpet Colors, Patterns & Textures. See the latest Trends in Carpeting & Order Samples. pace setter ... GET THE MOST OUT OF SHAW FLOORS TERMS AND CONDITIONS PRIVACY POLICY



Effect of cold water immersion on postexercise parasympathetic ...

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19074671/
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The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of cold water immersion (CWI) on postexercise parasympathetic reactivation. Ten male cyclists (age, ... Public health information (CDC) Prevention and treatment information (HHS) Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation Subject: 1 selected item: 19074671 - PubMed Name must be less than 100 characters Would you like email updates of new search results? Saved Search Alert Radio Buttons Send even when there aren't any new results Create a file for external citation management software Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol . 2009 Feb;296(2):H421-7. doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.01017.2008. Epub 2008 Dec 12. Effect of cold water immersion on postexercise parasympathetic reactivation M Buchheit  1 , J J Peiffer, C R Abbiss, P B Laursen 1 Research Laboratory, EA 3300 Exercise Physiology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Sports Sciences, University of Picardie, Jules Verne, Amiens, France. martin.buchheit@u-picardie.fr DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.01017.2008 Effect of cold water immersion on postexercise parasympathetic reactivation M Buchheit et al. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2009 Feb. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol . 2009 Feb;296(2):H421-7. doi: 10.1152/ajpheart.01017.2008. Epub 2008 Dec 12. M Buchheit  1 , J J Peiffer, C R Abbiss, P B Laursen 1 Research Laboratory, EA 3300 Exercise Physiology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Sports Sciences, University of Picardie, Jules Verne, Amiens, France. martin.buchheit@u-picardie.fr DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.01017.2008 The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of cold water immersion (CWI) on postexercise parasympathetic reactivation. Ten male cyclists (age, 29 +/- 6 yr) performed two repeated supramaximal cycling exercises (SE(1) and SE(2)) interspersed with a 20-min passive recovery period, during which they were randomly assigned to either 5 min of CWI in 14 degrees C or a control (N) condition where they sat in an environmental chamber (35.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C and 40.0 +/- 3.0% relative humidity). Rectal temperature (T(re)) and beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously. The time constant of HR recovery (HRRtau) and a time (30-s) varying vagal-related HR variability (HRV) index (rMSSD(30s)) were assessed during the 6-min period immediately following exercise. Resting vagal-related HRV indexes were calculated during 3-min periods 2 min before and 3 min after SE(1) and SE(2). Results showed no effect of CWI on T(re) (P = 0.29), SE performance (P = 0.76), and HRRtau (P = 0.61). In contrast, all vagal-related HRV indexes were decreased after SE(1) (P < 0.001) and tended to decrease even further after SE(2) under N condition but not with CWI. When compared with the N condition, CWI increased HRV indexes before (P < 0.05) and rMSSD(30s) after (P < 0.05) SE(2). Our study shows that CWI can significantly restore the impaired vagal-related HRV indexes observed after supramaximal exercise. CWI may serve as a simple and effective means to accelerate parasympathetic reactivation during the immediate period following supramaximal exercise.



Carpets

https://www.molinacarpetsinc.com/carpets
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ShawShaw. Martinet-Cold WaterMartinet-Cold Water. ShawShaw. Martinet- Winter WhiteMartinet- Winter White. ShawShaw. Martinet- DunesMartinet- Dunes ... Instock Promotions- Starting at $1.78 sqft installed Residential & Commercial Flooring We Do A Great Job! Just Ask Our Previous Customers! PROUD MEMBER OF THE GARNER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE All stock prices already include any other advertised discounts. Martinet-Cold WaterMartinet-Cold Water Martinet- Winter WhiteMartinet- Winter White Showbiz- ParadiseShowbiz- Paradise Showbiz-PaparazziShowbiz-Paparazzi Showbiz- Silver ScreenShowbiz- Silver Screen Pop Culture-Super HeroPop Culture-Super Hero Pop Culture-Skater BoyPop Culture-Skater Boy



Late Holocene variability of upper North Atlantic Deep Water ...

https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2003GC000598
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Dec 6, 2003 ... We discuss possible mechanisms for transmitting this cold, ... reduced by low bottom water calcite saturation states [Martin et al., 2002], ... Geochemistry, Geophysics, GeosystemsVolume 4, Issue 12 Late Holocene variability of upper North Atlantic Deep Water temperature and salinity Thomas M. Marchitto, Peter B. deMenocal, First published: 06 December 2003 [1] Magnesium/calcium ratios in benthic foraminifera (Cibicidoides pachyderma) from a sediment core on the Laurentian Slope (1854 m) exhibit strong millennial-scale fluctuations during the past 4000 years. We convert these data to seawater paleotemperatures using a new monospecific linear equation. Results suggest that the temperature of upper North Atlantic Deep Water (dominated by Labrador Seawater today) has varied by at least 2°C during the late Holocene. Millennial scale coolings coincide with previously identified periods of increased drift ice and regional glacier advances, including the Little Ice Age. Paired oxygen isotope measurements indicate that salinity and perhaps density were reduced during the cold periods. We discuss possible mechanisms for transmitting this cold, fresh signal from surface waters to intermediate depths. Our reconstructed late Holocene ranges in upper North Atlantic Deep Water properties greatly exceed those of the instrumental record and imply that large changes may be yet to come. [2] The warm climate of the present Holocene epoch was punctuated by a series of widespread, millennial scale cooling events. In the subpolar North Atlantic, petrologic tracers of ice rafted debris (IRD) document nine multicentury episodes of southward expansion of drift ice and hence polar waters since the end of the Younger Dryas cold period (∼11,500 cal BP) [Bond et al., 1997, 2001]. Each event was accompanied by sea surface cooling and freshening as inferred from planktonic foraminiferal assemblages and δ18O. The most recent of these events was the Little Ice Age (LIA) [Jennings and Weiner, 1996; Bond et al., 2001], which occurred in several stages between roughly AD 1300 and 1870 [Grove, 2001]. It was marked by alpine glacier advances throughout Europe and North America and is well documented in historical records of unusually harsh winters, increased sea ice, and poor crop yields [Denton and Karlén, 1973; Grove, 1988]. Earlier Holocene IRD peaks appear to correspond to additional alpine glacier expansions [Denton and Karlén, 1973], more winter-like atmospheric conditions over Greenland [O'Brien et al., 1995], strengthening of the cool Canary Current off western Africa [deMenocal et al., 2000], and suppression of the southwest Indian monsoon [Gupta et al., 2003].








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