Web Results

Malignant | Definition of Malignant by Merriam-Webster

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/malignant
site-preview

Examples of malignant in a Sentence. a highly malignant form of cancer a powerful and malignant influence. Recent Examples on the Web ... To save this word, you'll need to log in. ma·​lig·​nant | \ mə-ˈlig-nənt \ 1 : tending to produce death or deterioration especially : tending to infiltrate, metastasize, and terminate fatally 2a : evil in nature, influence, or effect : INJURIOUS a powerful and malignant influence b : passionately and relentlessly malevolent : aggressively malicious the malignant tongues of gossipers c obsolete : MALCONTENT, DISAFFECTED Synonyms & Antonyms for malignant bad [slang], bitchy, catty, cruel, despiteful, hateful, malevolent, malicious, malign, mean, nasty, spiteful, vicious, virulent benevolent, benign, benignant, loving, unmalicious Examples of malignant in a Sentence a highly malignant form of cancer a powerful and malignant influence Just about everybody in the Rex Theater knew that the death of Beau Biden in 2015 from a malignant brain tumor had prevented his grieving father from running for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016. — Susan Page, USA TODAY, "Analysis: Joe Biden insists he still has a path to the nomination. Others have trouble seeing it.," 12 Feb. 2020 Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had surgery in New York to remove two malignant growths in her left lung, the third time she had been treated for cancer since 1999. — BostonGlobe.com, "This day in history," 21 Dec. 2019 These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'malignant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.



Definition of malignancy - NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms - National ...

https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/.../malignancy
site-preview

A term for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and can invade nearby tissues. Malignant cells can also spread to other parts of the body ... The NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms features 8,545 terms related to cancer and medicine. We offer a widget that you can add to your website to let users look up cancer-related terms. Get NCI’s Dictionary of Cancer Terms Widget. The search textbox has an autosuggest feature. When you enter three or more characters, a list of up to 10 suggestions will popup under the textbox. Use the arrow keys to move through the suggestions. To select a suggestion, hit the enter key. Using the escape key closes the listbox and puts you back at the textbox. The radio buttons allow you to toggle between having all search items start with or contain the text you entered in the search box. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # malignancy listen (muh-LIG-nun-see) A term for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and can invade nearby tissues. Malignant cells can also spread to other parts of the body through the blood and lymph systems. There are several main types of malignancy. Carcinoma is a malignancy that begins in the skin or in tissues that line or cover internal organs. Sarcoma is a malignancy that begins in bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels, or other connective or supportive tissue. Leukemia is a malignancy that starts in blood-forming tissue, such as the bone marrow, and causes large numbers of abnormal blood cells to be produced and enter the blood. Lymphoma and multiple myeloma are malignancies that begin in the cells of the immune system. Central nervous system cancers are malignancies that begin in the tissues of the brain and spinal cord. Also called cancer.



Malignancy - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malignancy
site-preview

Malignancy is the tendency of a medical condition to become progressively worse. Malignancy is most familiar as a characterization of cancer. A malignant ... From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search This article is about medical terminology. For other uses, see Malignancy (disambiguation). "Malignant" redirects here. For other uses, see Malignant (disambiguation). Malignant tumor (R) spreads uncontrollably and invades the surrounding tissues, unlike benign tumor (L), which remains self contained from neighbouring tissue. Malignancy (from Latin male, meaning 'badly', and -gnus, meaning 'born') is the tendency of a medical condition to become progressively worse. Malignancy is most familiar as a characterization of cancer. A malignant tumor contrasts with a non-cancerous benign tumor in that a malignancy is not self-limited in its growth, is capable of invading into adjacent tissues, and may be capable of spreading to distant tissues. A benign tumor has none of those properties. Malignancy in cancers is characterized by anaplasia, invasiveness, and metastasis.[1] Malignant tumors are also characterized by genome instability, so that cancers, as assessed by whole genome sequencing, frequently have between 10,000 and 100,000 mutations in their entire genomes.[2] Cancers usually show tumour heterogeneity, containing multiple subclones.[3] They also frequently have reduced expression of DNA repair enzymes due to epigenetic methylation of DNA repair genes or altered microRNAs that control DNA repair gene expression. Uses of "malignant" in oncology: Malignancy, malignant neoplasm and malignant tumor are synonymous with cancer



Understanding Cancer: Metastasis, Stages of Cancer, and More

https://www.onhealth.com/content/1/cancer_types_treatments
site-preview

Jul 22, 2016 ... Malignant Tumors Vs. Benign Tumors. A tumor is an abnormal mass of cells. Tumors can either be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant ( ... Reviewed By Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD on 7/22/2016 In the most basic terms, cancer refers to cells that grow out-of-control and invade other tissues. Cells may become cancerous due to the accumulation of defects, or mutations, in their DNA. Certain inherited genetic defects (for example, BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations) and infections can increase the risk of cancer. Environmental factors (for example, air pollution) and poor lifestyle choices—such as smoking and heavy alcohol use—can also damage DNA and lead to cancer. Most of the time, cells are able to detect and repair DNA damage. If a cell is severely damaged and cannot repair itself, it usually undergoes so-called programmed cell death or apoptosis. Cancer occurs when damaged cells grow, divide, and spread abnormally instead of self-destructing as they should. Malignant Tumors Vs. Benign Tumors A tumor is an abnormal mass of cells. Tumors can either be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign tumors grow locally and do not spread. As a result, benign tumors are not considered cancer. They can still be dangerous, especially if they press against vital organs like the brain. Malignant tumors have the ability to spread and invade other tissues. This process, known as metastasis, is a key feature of cancer. There are many different types of malignancy based on where a cancer tumor originates. Metastasis is the process whereby cancer cells break free from a malignant tumor and travel to and invade other tissues in the body. Cancer cells metastasize to other sites via the lymphatic system and the bloodstream. Cancer cells from the original—or primary—tumor can travel to other sites such as the lungs, bones, liver, brain, and other areas. These metastatic tumors are "secondary cancers" because they arise from the primary tumor.



Differences Between a Malignant and Benign Tumor

https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-does-malignant-and-benign-mean- 514240
site-preview

Nov 4, 2019 ... Malignant means that the tumor is made of cancer cells, and it can invade nearby tissues. Some cancer cells can move into the bloodstream or ... Differences Between a Malignant and Benign Tumor By Lisa Fayed Medically reviewed by Doru Paul, MD Updated on January 27, 2020 Definition of Benign Tumors: Noncancerous Definition of Malignant Tumors: Cancerous Differences Between Benign and Malignant Tumors Can a Benign Tumor Turn Malignant? If you have been diagnosed with a tumor, the first step your doctor will take is to find out whether it is malignant or benign, as this will affect your treatment plan. In short, the meaning of malignant is cancerous and the meaning of benign is non-cancerous. Learn more about how either diagnosis affects your health. A tumor is an abnormal lump or growth of cells. When the cells in the tumor are normal, it is benign. Something just went wrong, and they overgrew and produced a lump. When the cells are abnormal and can grow uncontrollably, they are cancerous cells, and the tumor is malignant. To determine whether a tumor is benign or cancerous, a doctor can take a sample of the cells with a biopsy procedure. Then the biopsy is analyzed under a microscope by a pathologist, a doctor specializing in laboratory science. Definition of Benign Tumors: Noncancerous If the cells are not cancerous, the tumor is benign. It won't invade nearby tissues or spread to other areas of the body (metastasize). A benign tumor is less worrisome unless it is pressing on nearby tissues, nerves, or blood vessels and causing damage.1 Fibroids in the uterus or lipomas are examples of benign tumors. Benign tumors may need to be removed by surgery.1 They can grow very large, sometimes weighing pounds. They can be dangerous, such as when they occur in the brain and crowd the normal structures in the enclosed space of the skull. They can press on vital organs or block channels. Also, some types of benign tumors such as intestinal polyps are considered precancerous and are removed to prevent them becoming malignant. Benign tumors usually don't recur once removed, but if they do it is usually in the same place.







malignant - Wiktionary ***** IPA: /məˈlɪɡnənt/. AdjectiveEdit. malignant (comparative more malignant, superlative most malignant). Harmful, malevolent, injurious. malignant temper ...

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/malignant

IPA: /məˈlɪɡnənt/. AdjectiveEdit. malignant (comparative more malignant,
superlative most malignant). Harmful, malevolent, injurious. malignant temper ...



Ads