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How A Missouri Man Made NCAA Basketball History By Not Playing ...

https://www.kcur.org/.../how-a-missouri-man-made-ncaa-basketball-history- by-not-playing
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Mar 24, 2016 ... Senior forward Jerry Armstrong grew up in rural Eagleville, Missouri. He played throughout the season and in the tournament, but he sat out ... How A Missouri Man Made NCAA Basketball History By Not Playing Published March 24, 2016 at 5:00 AM CDT The Texas Western basketball team made history by winning the 1966 NCAA Championship playing only African-American players. Jerry Armstrong (top row, second from the left) was born and raised in Eagleville, Missouri. The NCAA soon will crown a new college basketball champion, but they're also looking back 50 years at a championship game that made history.  Senior forward Jerry Armstrong grew up in rural Eagleville, Missouri. He played throughout the season and in the tournament, but he sat out that game. Why? He's white. Texas Western only played African-American players to beat an all-white Kentucky team and win the championship. David Lattin, one of the African-American starters in the title game, there's a misconception about the 1966 Texas Western roster. “Even though only the African-Americans played in the game that night, the other white guys and the Hispanic guy played during the season,” says Lattin. “They were very important to our success.” Jerry Armstrong is a retired high school basketball coach and principal. He now lives in southern Missouri. How in the world did Jerry Armstrong, a 6-foot-5 high school kid from northern Missouri, end up in El Paso, Texas, at the college now known as UTEP? Armstrong says his high school coach, George Kling, swayed him. “My coach told me, ‘Jerry you could go to a big university if you want and be a small fish, or you could go to a smaller university and maybe be a bigger fish,’” says Armstrong.



Jerry Armstrong - Missouri Sports Hall of Fame

mosportshalloffame.com/inductees/jerry-armstrong/
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But he fell in love with basketball in the fifth grade, when he was asked to join the seventh-grade team. “They needed extra players because it was such a small ... Missouri Sports Hall of Fame Inductee Teams: Mansfield, Mansfield High School, North Harrison, Texas Western To Jerry Armstrong, the cause was bigger than one individual. Decades after he was part of the 1966 Texas Western team that used the first all-black lineup to win an NCAA Tournament – Armstrong never got in the game that night — the Missouri native received an apology from coach Don Haskins. “I said, ‘Well, Coach, you know I wanted to play. And I felt like I could play,’” Armstrong recalled. “And I said, ‘But (the movie) ‘Glory Road’ and helping blacks all over the southeast (break the color barrier in college basketball), that was a good thing. I was glad to have been a part of that history.’” Armstrong certainly made an impact in and beyond basketball, first as a standout at North Harrison High School and later as a longtime high school basketball coach in the Show-Me State. And for his lifetime of work, the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame is proud to induct Armstrong with the Class of 2016. Armstrong and his four brothers grew up on a farm near Eagleville, near the Iowa line. They hunted, fished and played sports like so many others. But he fell in love with basketball in the fifth grade, when he was asked to join the seventh-grade team. “They needed extra players because it was such a small school,” said Armstrong, who eventually graduated with 28 others. “The principal was our coach, and he came up the stairs to our room and took me down to practice.  There weren’t really any other kids upset with me, to be able to do that. But I loved every minute of it.”



Jerry Armstrong

https://www.utep.edu/glory-road/the-team/jerry-armstrong.html
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He played in 24 games in the 1966 season as a senior. Armstrong retired in 1996 after 30 years in education. He was a basketball coach at four schools in ... A tough defender at 6 foot 4 and 195 pounds, Jerry Armstrong was a very valuable player for the Miners. He played in 24 games in the 1966 season as a senior. Armstrong retired in 1996 after 30 years in education. He was a basketball coach at four schools in Missouri over 21 years, compiling a 329-195 record. Armstrong also taught high school biology and physical education. Later he was a junior high school and high school principal. Armstrong and his wife, Mary, make their home in Mountain Grove, Mo. They have two sons and four grandchildren. The University of Texas at El Paso Office of University Communications THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO 500 West University Avenue | El Paso, TX 79968 | 915-747-5000 | SITE FEEDBACK



MARCH 2006 - Glory - Rural Missouri

www.ruralmissouri.coop/06pages/06MarGlory.html
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says the former coach, principal and basketball star. “It really wasn't that ... Jerry Armstrong is shown in the top row, second player from the left. Photo courtesy of  ... A reluctant hero on the road to Jerry Armstrong became part of history as a member of the 1966 NCAA champion Western Texas Miners. The team’s championship season is the subject of a Disney movie called “Glory Road.” Forty years ago Jerry Armstrong became part of history. Then he promptly forgot about it. He usually doesn’t wear the NCAA Championship ring he earned as a member of the 1965-66 Texas Western college basketball team. For 40 years, the Intercounty Electric Co-op member hardly ever talked about the challenges of that storied season. But that all changed this winter when the movie “Glory Road” opened. Jerry, along with his entire family, traveled to El Paso, Texas, to see himself portrayed by actor Austin Nichols in the story of how black athletes got their first chance to play major college sports. Since the movie opened, the phone in Jerry’s Mountain Grove home hasn’t stopped ringing as friends, family and former players call to ask the same question. “I even had an assistant coach call and say, ‘Jerry, why didn’t you tell me about this?’” says the former coach, principal and basketball star. “It really wasn’t that important to me. I loved what I did and don’t get me wrong, winning a national championship was great. But I was more into coaching, in teaching, than in what I had accomplished.” The 1966 Texas Western College Miners was the first team to win a national college basketball championship fielding an all-black starting lineup. Jerry Armstrong is shown in the top row, second player from the left. Photo courtesy of University of Texas — El Paso.



WEB EXTRA: Jerry Armstrong talks about Texas Western days ...

https://www.ozarkssportszone.com/.../web-extra-jerry-armstrong-talks-about- texas-western-days/
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Dec 14, 2016 ... ... High School Boys Basketball Team. Jerry Armstrong, North Harrison & Texas Western. Jerry Armstrong played at North Harrison High School ... Posted: Wednesday, December 14th, 2016 Slider, Stories | Basketball| Softball | Marshfield WEB EXTRA: JERRY ARMSTRONG TALKS ABOUT TEXAS WESTERN DAYS No compatible source was found for this video.Armstrong was inducted into the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame Wednesday afternoon.WEB EXTRA: Jerry Armstrong talks about Texas Western days The Missouri Sports Hall of Fame on Wednesday proudly inducted Jerry Armstrong, part of Texas Western’s 1966 national championship team and a longtime Missouri high school basketball coach, as well as Malta Bend and Mizzou standout Charlie Henke, Drury University’s Nate Quinn, Missouri State Lady Bear Jeanette Tendai and the 1990 Raytown South High School Boys Basketball Team. Jerry Armstrong, North Harrison & Texas Western Jerry Armstrong played at North Harrison High School, where he earned all-conference three years, all-district two years and All-State his senior year. A 6-foot-5 standout, he led North Harrison to the state championship game in 1962 before falling to Bradleyville, 59-49. Armstrong then went on to play for Texas Western in El Paso. There, he became part of one of the most memorable teams in college basketball history. The 1966 team won the NCAA championship, fielding an all-black starting lineup in the finals against the Kentucky Wildcats, then coached by Adolph Rupp, who did not integrate his team until 1972. Armstrong did not play in in the NCAA title game but later was quoted as saying that, had he played, Texas Western and coach Don Haskins, would never have made such a historical statement. The 2006 movie “Glory Road” was based on that team. However, Armstrong played a key role in the tournament semifinals, holding Utah’s Jerry Chambers to only a few points in the second half after Chambers scored 24 before halftime. Armstrong was a three-year letterman at Western and went on to coach at Trenton, King City, Richmond and Mansfield high schools in Missouri. In 21 years, his teams won seven conference titles and made the state playoffs six times. His King City team reached the state semifinals in 1987 and finished third. Overall, Armstrong was 329-195 before retiring in 1996, and is an inductee of the Missouri Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Fame.








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