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The Lost And Forgotten Supermarkets Of LA's Past: LAist

https://laist.com/.../las_lost_supermarkets_grocery_stores_of_the_past.php
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Jul 5, 2019 ... Hughes. After spending his career operating Thriftimart stores, Joseph Hughes opened a store under his name in Granada Hills in the mid-1950s. Support vital coronavirus coverage on LAist now. LAist reporting is free for all to rely on, but needs your help today to stay that way. The Lost And Forgotten Supermarkets Of LA's Past BY JIM THURMAN IN FOOD ON JULY 5, 2019 8:00 AM January 29, 1959: "Market workers dust off equipment and check price lists at Ralphs Market in North Hollywood as 28-day food market dispute ends with tentative agreement on new five-year contract between Retail Clerks Union and owners of 1,000 supermarkets. Stores will open tomorrow. From left are Robert Hagstrom, manager; Ralph Edwards, butcher and Mrs. R. H. Hagstrom, clerk." (Valley Times Collection/Los Angeles Public Library Collection) When Angelenos go food shopping these days, it's usually at our nearest Vons, Ralphs, Gelson's, Trader Joe's or Whole Foods. With two or three corporations controlling most supermarket chains, our options are limited. That wasn't always the case. Prior to the leveraged buyout and merger mania of the late 1980s and early '90s, Los Angeles had a bunch of local grocery store chains. July 31, 1984: "A supermarket union worker stacks picket signs for possible strike use at a drop-off point in Silver Lake area." (Toru Kawana/Herald Examiner Collection/Los Angeles Public Library Collection) With a potential supermarket strike looming if the workers' union and store owners can't agree on a new contract, we thought it was time to take a look at a few of the grocery stores of Southern California's past. 1938: Alexander's Market at 3029 S. Vermont Ave. This view includes GallenKamp's Shoes (3035 S. Vermont Ave.) and Mode O' Day (3033 S. Vermont Ave.. (Herman J. Schultheis/Los Angeles Photographers Collection/Los Angeles Public Library Collection)



History of Hughes Markets, Inc. – FundingUniverse

www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/hughes-markets-inc-history/
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A respected operator in the southern California supermarket industry, Hughes Markets, Inc. operates a chain of grocery stores in the greater Los Angeles area. Browse Company Profiles:  (0-9)ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Wholly Owned Subsidiary of Quality Food Centers, Inc. A respected operator in the southern California supermarket industry, Hughes Markets, Inc. operates a chain of grocery stores in the greater Los Angeles area. For 45 years Hughes Markets was privately owned and family-operated, but in 1997 the company was acquired by Quality Food Centers, Inc., a Seattle, Washington-based supermarket chain. During the late 1990s, the company operated 56 stores and controlled 5.5 percent of the southern California market. The key to Hughes Markets' success in the fiercely competitive southern California grocery store industry was its adherence to a simple and focused operating philosophy, the originator of which was the company's founder, Joseph Hughes. Hughes spent his adulthood working in grocery stores, starting in 1934 when he went to work for Thriftmart in New Jersey. He stayed with Thriftmart for nearly 20 years, then packed his bags in 1952 and made the transcontinental trip to southern California, where he would lay the foundation for one of the region's largest supermarket chains. Although Hughes had spent nearly a lifetime's work at Thriftmart in New Jersey, he would spend another 30 years working as a grocery store operator in southern California. Hughes embarked on the second half of his lengthy career in 1952, when he opened a Thriftmart franchise in Studio City. From there he opened two more Thriftmart franchises during the next two years, one in Van Nuys and another in Hollywood. The opening of his next store, which was located in then-rural Granada Hills, marked a symbolic moment in Hughes's life. When he opened the doors to his fourth store, gone was the familiar Thriftmart sign marking the entrance. For the first time in 20 years, Hughes had no ties to Thriftmart. The sign above his store--the first store he could genuinely call his own--read: Hughes Market. Over the course of the next four decades, the sign that debuted in Granada Hills would become a fixture in the southern California supermarket industry, as Hughes and his family shaped the company into a powerful regional force.




Ralphs - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralphs
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Ralphs is an American supermarket chain in Southern California. The largest subsidiary of ... At the same time, they also acquired the 57-store Hughes Family Markets chain. In October 1998, the parent company, Fred Meyer, merged with ... From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search This article is about the grocery store chain. For the NRHP listed building, see Ralphs Grocery Store (Los Angeles, California). A Ralphs Marketplace in Porter Ranch, Los Angeles, California Founded 1873 (147 years ago) in Los Angeles, California Headquarters Compton, California, United States[1] Products Bakery, dairy, deli, frozen foods, grocery, meat, pharmacy, produce, seafood, snacks, liquor Parent Independent (1873–1968 and 1992-1994) Federated Department Stores (1968-1992) Yucaipa Companies (1994–1997) Ralphs is an American supermarket chain in Southern California. The largest subsidiary of Cincinnati-based Kroger, it is the oldest such chain west of the Mississippi River. Kroger also operates stores under the Food 4 Less and Foods Co. names in California. Ralphs Grocery Company was founded in 1873 by George Albert Ralphs and his brother, Walter Benjamin Ralphs.[2] The original store was located at Sixth and Spring Streets in Los Angeles, California. In the 20th century, Ralphs became a grocery pioneer, offering self-service markets with checkout stands in distributed locations. The company employed notable architects in designing its stores, and the former Ralphs Grocery Store building built in 1929 in Westwood Village has been photographed by Ansel Adams, declared a Historic Cultural Monument, and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In the 1980s, it created a chain of hybrid supermarket/warehouse stores called The Giant,[3] which failed, but the concept returned with the company's merger with the Food 4 Less discount chain. In 1968, Ralphs was acquired by Federated Department Stores, based in Cincinnati.[4] Then in 1992, Federated, now known as Macy's, Inc., sold Ralphs to a group of owners, led by Edward J. DeBartolo Corporation, after filing for bankruptcy two years earlier in 1990.[5] In 1994, Ralphs was acquired by the Yucaipa Companies for $1.5 billion. Yucaipa owned ABC Markets, Alpha Beta, Boys Markets, and Cala Foods. Soon, all ABC Markets, Alpha Betas, and Boys Markets were rebranded as Ralphs. At the same time, Food 4 Less was merged with Ralphs. In 1997, Yucaipa sold Ralphs to Fred Meyer, owner of several chains in the west. Soon, Ralphs Marketplace stores started opening; these stores are based on the Fred Meyer model but without apparel. At the same time, they also acquired the 57-store Hughes Family Markets chain. In October 1998, the parent company, Fred Meyer, merged with Kroger of Cincinnati, Ohio.



TRYING TO DO A MASSIVE GROCERY SHOP PLASTIC FREE (IT ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjYn9NfnBvo
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Nov 18, 2018 ... Meghan Hughes. Loading... Unsubscribe ... In this video, I TRY to grocery shop plastic free & as you might be able to conclude... It was MUCH ... We’ll stop supporting this browser soon. For the best experience please update your browser. Your browser does not currently recognize any of the video formats available. Click here to visit our frequently asked questions about HTML5 video. TRYING TO DO A MASSIVE GROCERY SHOP PLASTIC FREE (IT WAS HARD) | + GIVEAWAY | MEGHAN HUGHES OR put in my promo code "MeghanH" if you download it from the App Store/Google Play. I've teamed up with Drop this week to give away a variety of gift card prizes through the app to my viewers! 100 of you will be chosen at random to receive gift cards ranging from $5-$25 (5,000-25,000pts in app) After you download, link at least one of your debit or credit cards for a chance to win! In this video, I TRY to grocery shop plastic free & as you might be able to conclude... It was MUCH harder than I expected! Many things I deem "necessary" to have in my pantry come wrapped in plastic & this video is bringing awareness to that issue, as well as giving tips on saving money & working towards shopping more sustainable. ENJOY! $10 POSTMATES CREDIT W/ CODE "5ica" FREE UBER RIDE W/ CODE "UBERSTAYSMILIN" Business Inquiries: meghanhughesbusinessinquiries@gmail.com Write me: PO box 235 Colton, OR 97017 FTC: This video is sponsored by Drop. EASY AS FRICK MEALS W/ MEG + FIN | EP. 2 | MEGHAN HUGHES Why buying plastic-free groceries is so hard (Marketplace) REACTING TO MY PSYCHIC READING (4 YEARS LATER) WHAT I WISH I KNEW BEFORE I LOST MY VIRGINITY | BIG SIS ADVICE








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