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New York City agar - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City_agar
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The N.Y.C (New York City) medium or GC (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) medium agar is used for isolating Gonococci. The growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae colonies ... From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search The N.Y.C (New York City) medium or GC (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) medium agar is used for isolating Gonococci.[1] The growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae colonies on New York City medium agar The agar base is composed of:[1] Dipotassium hydrogen phosphate 4 Potassium dihydrogen phosphate 1 Background and principles[edit] NYC Agar Base was originally developed by Fauer, Weisburd and Wilson[1][2][3] at the New York City Department of Health for selective isolation of pathogenic Neisseria species from clinical specimens. It consists of primarily a peptone-corn starch agar-base buffered with phosphates and supplemented with horse plasma, horse haemoglobin, dextrose, yeast autolysate and antibiotics.[1][2] This medium is superior to other media generally employed for the isolation of Neisseria species.[1][4][5] The transparent nature of the medium helps in studying the colonial types.[6] Proteose peptone, horse plasma, haemoglobin provide nutrients for the growth of N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis. Phosphate buffers the medium. The selective supplement added contains the antibiotics vancomycin, colistin, nystatin and trimethoprim, to suppress the accompanying flora. Vancomycin is inhibitory for gram-positive bacteria. Colistin inhibits gram negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas species, while Proteus is inhibited by trimethoprim.[7] The combination of trimethoprim and colistin acts synergistically against gram-negative bacilli.[8] Starch neutralizes the toxic metabolites produced by Neisseria. The yeast autolysate supplement fulfils the CO2 requirements needed to enhance Neisseria growth. Yeast contains oxaloacetic acid which is metabolized by gonococci to produce sufficient CO2 for growth of capnophilic gonococci.[9] Also, presence of yeast autolysate reduces the lag phase of growth of Neisseria, thus enhancing both size and number of colonies. The specimen can be directly streaked on the medium to obtain maximum isolation.



New York City Agar | Culture Media | Microbe Notes

https://microbenotes.com/new-york-city-agar/
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Oct 27, 2019 ... NYC Agar Base medium was originally developed by Fauer, Weisburd and Wilson at the New York City Department of Health for selective ... Online Microbiology and Biology Notes Home » Culture Media » New York City Agar October 27, 2019 by Sagar Aryal Last Updated on January 9, 2020 by Sagar Aryal NYC Agar Base medium was originally developed by Fauer, Weisburd and Wilson at the New York City Department of Health for selective isolation of pathogenic Neisseria species from clinical specimens. NYC medium, primarily designed for isolation of pathogenic Neisseria, also readily supports the growth of large-colony mycoplasmas and T-mycoplasmas (Ureaplasma). It is a transparent medium, highly-selective which permits direct, microscopic observation and presumptive identification of mycoplasmas, as well as Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Dipotassium hydrogen phosphate 4.0  Potassium dihydrogen phosphate 1.0  Suspend 25.50 grams in 320 ml distilled water. Heat to boiling to dissolve the medium completely. Sterilize by autoclaving at 15 lbs pressure (121°C) for 15 minutes. Avoid overheating. Cool to 45-50°C and add aseptically 100 ml of sedimented horse blood cells and 60 ml of citrated horse plasma along with rehydrated contents of 1 vial of NYC Supplement and 1 vial of Yeast Autolysate Supplement. Mix well and pour into sterile Petri plates. NYC agar is a transparent medium, comprises of peptone, corn starch agar base buffered with phosphates and supplemented with horse plasma, horse hemoglobin, dextrose, yeast autolysate, and some antibiotics.  Proteose peptone is rich in proteoses, peptones and free amino acids which provide nutrients for the growth of the bacterium. Phosphate buffers the medium. Starch neutralizes the toxic metabolites produced by Neisseria. Sodium chloride provides essential electrolytes maintaining osmotic equilibrium thereby maintaining the integrity of cells. The selective supplement added contains the antibiotics vancomycin that inhibits gram-positive bacteria, colistin that inhibit gram-negative bacilli including Pseudomonas species, nystatin suppress yeast growth and trimethoprim lactate prevents Proteus species swarming.  The combination of trimethoprim and colistin acts synergistically against gram-negative bacilli. Lysed horse blood, horse serum, yeast dialysate are the enrichments that permit a luxuriant recovery of pathogenic Neisseria species. The yeast autolysate supplement fulfills the CO2 requirements needed to enhance Neisseria growth. Yeast contains oxaloacetic acid which is metabolized by gonococci to produce sufficient CO2 for the growth of capnophilic gonococci. Also, the presence of yeast autolysate reduces the lag phase of the growth of Neisseria, thus enhancing both size and number of colonies.



Agar, Madhya Pradesh - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agar,_Madhya_Pradesh
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Agar is a town with a municipal government in the state of Madhya Pradesh, India . It is the administrative headquarters for the Agar Malwa District which was ... From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Find sources: "Agar, Madhya Pradesh" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (August 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Location in Madhya Pradesh, India Coordinates: 23°42′59″N 76°00′59″ECoordinates: 23°42′59″N 76°00′59″E  • Official Hindi and Malwi Nearest city Ujjain, Indore, Jhalawar, Dewas. Lok Sabha constituency Dewas-Shajapur Agar is a town with a municipal government in the state of Madhya Pradesh, India. It is the administrative headquarters for the Agar Malwa District which was formed in 2013 from a part of Shajapur District. The town is situated along the ujjain—Kota SH-27 highway. Agar was the capital of the Parmar Kingdom during the 10th century along with Avantika (Ujjain), then it was the most popular visiting place of Mughal kingdom when Mandu was its capital. The Mughals liked to spend summer vacations there because the temperature during summer nights was very low compared to other areas in the region. During the Sindhia state a number of palaces were built which today are used for city court and for other government offices. As of 2001 India census,[1] In the 2001 census, Agar had a population of 31,202, where males constituted 51.8% of the population and females 48.2%. In the 2011 census the population had grown to 50,000. Males now constituted 52% of the population and females 48%.[citation needed]



From Cripplegate to Agar Town: inside London's vanished ...

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/.../london-vanished-neighbourhoods- cripplegate-agar-town-limehouse-chinatown
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Jun 24, 2015 ... Agar Town, built in the 1840s behind what is now St Pancras Station, sounded like a respectable Victorian suburb – with streets called ... Uncaught (in promise) undefined Uncaught (in promise) undefined Uncaught (in promise) undefined The Guardian - Back to home Contribute Sign in What term do you want to search? Search with google From Cripplegate to Agar Town: inside London's vanished neighbourhoods Don’t get too attached to the London you see: Streatham was a spa retreat, Limehouse housed Chinatown and the area around St Pancras station was a disease hotbed nicknamed Ague Town Which London neighbourhoods will disappear next? Wed 24 Jun 2015 07.41 BST Last modified on Mon 3 Feb 2020 12.54 GMT Contemporary London is a sometimes bizarre, often remarkable combination of past versions of itself: a Romano-medieval heart, Georgian estates, Victorian inner suburbs, mid-20th-century outer suburbs. These legacies are crucial to London’s character, but the image has a negative: neighbourhoods lost in the shadows, once taken for granted, now forgotten. This process of vanishing continues all around us. To understand the change that is happening in London right now, it helps to place it in the context of the past. Many vanished neighbourhoods were destined to disappear, superseded by changing economies, technologies, populations and fashions. Others were deliberately demolished to improve the city. Are we sure that our estate redevelopment plans are so different to those of the Victorians, who cleared poorer areas with what seems to us now like reckless abandon? By taking a closer look at vanished London, we can see how we are reshaping the city today – and maybe take a better guess at whether future generations of Londoners will approve.








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